Nature Communications: Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing

Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits based on variable super-semi junctions.

Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing (nature.com)

Press Release: A microwave-free approach to superconducting quantum computing uses design principles gleaned from semiconductor spin qubits. (eurekalert.org)



Preprint: Semiconductor-inspired superconducting quantum computing

Yun-Pil Shim, Charles Tahan

Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some almost magical and very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control with minimal overhead (zero overhead in 2-qubit gates), and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is especially suited to qubits based on variable super-semi junctions.

Semiconductor-inspired superconducting quantum computing (arxiv.org)



IEEE: Superconducting-Semiconductor Quantum Devices: From Qubits to Particle Detectors

Yun-Pil Shim, Charles Tahan

Recent improvements in materials growth and fabrication techniques may finally allow for superconducting semiconductors to realize their potential. Here, we build on a recent proposal to construct superconducting devices such as wires, Josephson junctions, and qubits inside and out-of single crystal silicon or germanium. Using atomistic fabrication techniques such as STM hydrogen lithography, heavily doped superconducting regions within a single crystal could be constructed. We describe the characteristic parameters of basic superconducting elements-a 1-D wire and a tunneling Josephson junction-and estimate the values for boron-doped silicon. The epitaxial, single-crystal nature of these devices, along with the extreme flexibility in device design down to the single-atom scale, may enable lower noise or new types of devices and physics. We consider applications for such supersilicon devices, showing that the state-of-the-art transmon qubit and the sought-after phase-slip qubit can both be realized. The latter qubit leverages the natural high kinetic inductance of these materials. Building on this, we explore how kinetic inductance-based particle detectors (e.g., photon or phonon) could be realized with potential application in astronomy or nanomechanics. We discuss supersemi devices (such as in silicon, germanium, or diamond) which would not require atomistic fabrication approaches and could be realized today.

Superconducting-Semiconductor Quantum Devices: From Qubits to Particle Detectors (ieee.org)



Nature Communications: Bottom-up superconducting and Josephson junction devices inside a group-IV semiconductor

Yun-Pil Shim, Charles Tahan

Superconducting circuits are exceptionally flexible, enabling many different devices from sensors to quantum computers. Separately, epitaxial semiconductor devices such as spin qubits in silicon offer more limited device variation but extraordinary quantum properties for a solid-state system. It might be possible to merge the two approaches, making single-crystal superconducting devices out of a semiconductor by utilizing the latest atomistic fabrication techniques. Here we propose superconducting devices made from precision hole-doped regions within a silicon (or germanium) single crystal. We analyse the properties of this superconducting semiconductor and show that practical superconducting wires, Josephson tunnel junctions or weak links, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and qubits are feasible. This work motivates the pursuit of ‘bottom-up’ superconductivity for improved or fundamentally different technology and physics.

Bottom-up superconducting and Josephson junction devices inside a group-IV semiconductor (nature.com)



Preprint: Superconducting-semiconductor quantum devices: from qubits to particle detectors

Yun-Pil Shim, Charles Tahan

Recent improvements in materials growth and fabrication techniques may finally allow for superconducting semiconductors to realize their potential. Here we build on a recent proposal to construct superconducting devices such as wires, Josephson junctions, and qubits inside and out-of single crystal silicon or germanium. Using atomistic fabrication techniques such as STM hydrogen lithography, heavily-doped superconducting regions within a single crystal could be constructed. We describe the characteristic parameters of basic superconducting elements—-a 1D wire and a tunneling Josephson junction—-and estimate the values for boron-doped silicon. The epitaxial, single-crystal nature of these devices, along with the extreme flexibility in device design down to the single-atom scale, may enable lower-noise or new types of devices and physics. We consider applications for such super-silicon devices, showing that the state-of-the-art transmon qubit and the sought-after phase-slip qubit can both be realized. The latter qubit leverages the natural high kinetic inductance of these materials. Building on this, we explore how kinetic inductance based particle detectors (e.g., photon or phonon) could be realized with potential application in astronomy or nanomechanics. We discuss super-semi devices (such as in silicon, germanium, or diamond) which would not require atomistic fabrication approaches and could be realized today.

Superconducting-semiconductor quantum devices: from qubits to particle detectors (arxiv.org)



Preprint: Bottom-up superconducting and Josephson junction devices inside a Group-IV semiconductor

Yun-Pil Shim, Charles Tahan

Superconducting circuits are exceptionally flexible, enabling many different devices from sensors to quantum computers. Separately, epitaxial semiconductor devices such as spin qubits in silicon offer more limited device variation but extraordinary quantum properties for a solid-state system. It might be possible to merge the two approaches, making single-crystal superconducting devices out of a semiconductor by utilizing the latest atomistic fabrication techniques. Here we propose superconducting devices made from precision hole-doped regions within a silicon (or germanium) single crystal. We analyze the properties of this superconducting semiconductor and show that practical superconducting wires, Josephson tunnel junctions or weak links, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), and qubits are feasible. This work motivates the pursuit of “bottom-up” superconductivity for improved or fundamentally different technology and physics.

Bottom-up superconducting and Josephson junction devices inside a group-IV semiconductor (arxiv.org)




Charles Tahan
Physicist in Washington, D.C.